My favorite TED talks

TED is a non-profit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design. Since then its scope has become ever broader.

Here is a list of my favorite TED talks (in no particular order):

Daphne Koller: What we’re learning from online education
Daphne Koller, the co-founder of Coursera, describes how online education is changing the world and is providing research opportunities into how people learn. Each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed.
Peter Norvig: The 100,000 student classroom
Peter Norvig, a leading American computer scientist, an expert on Artificial Intelligence and the director of research at Google Inc., describes his experience with teaching an online class.
Salman Khan: Let’s use video to reinvent education
Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects. He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script — give students video lectures to watch at home, and do “homework” in the classroom with the teacher available to help.
Ken Robinson: Schools kill creativity
Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity. Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we’re educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence.
Susan Cain: The power of introverts
In a culture where being social and outgoing are prized above all else, it can be difficult, even shameful, to be an introvert. But, as Susan Cain argues in this passionate talk, introverts bring extraordinary talents and abilities to the world, and should be encouraged and celebrated.
Brian Greene: Making sense of String Theory
Physicist Brian Greene explains superstring theory, the idea that minuscule strands of energy vibrating in 11 dimensions create every particle and force in the universe.
Nicholas Negroponte: One Laptop per Child
Nicholas Negroponte, founder of the MIT Media Laboratory, describes how the One Laptop Per Child project will build and distribute the “$100 laptop.”
Richard Baraniuk: Open-Source Learning
Rice University professor Richard Baraniuk explains the vision behind Connexions, his open-source, online education system. It cuts out the textbook, allowing teachers to share and modify course materials freely, anywhere in the world.
Bjorn Lomborg: Global priorities bigger than climate change
Danish political scientist Bjorn Lomborg heads the Copenhagen Consensus, which has prioritized the world’s greatest problems — global warming, world poverty, disease — based on how effective our solutions might be. It’s a thought-provoking, even provocative list.
Ray Kurzweil: The accelerating power of technology
Inventor, entrepreneur and visionary Ray Kurzweil explains in abundant, grounded detail why, by the 2020s, we will have reverse-engineered the human brain and nanobots will be operating your consciousness.

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